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Panic Disorder

PanicDisorder

What is Panic disorder?

What’s happening?

Imagine you’ve just stepped into an elevator and suddenly your heart races, your chest aches, you break out in a cold sweat and feel as if the elevator is about to crash to the ground. What’s happening?

 

Imagine you are driving home from the grocery store and suddenly things seem to be out of control. You feel hot flashes, things around you blur, you can’t tell where you are, and you feel as if you’re dying. What’s happening?

What’s happening is a panic attack, an uncontrollable panic response to ordinary, nonthreatening situations. Panic attacks are often an indication that a person has panic disorder.Your Read More Link Text

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Word cloud for Obsessive-compulsive disorder

What is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

A woman visits her dermatologist, complaining of extremely dry skin and seldom feeling clean. She showers for two hours every day.

A lawyer insists on making coffee several times each day. His colleagues do not realize that he lives in fear that the coffee will be poisoned, and he feels compelled to pour most of it down the drain. The lawyer is so obsessed with these thoughts that he spends 12 hours a day at work — four of them worrying about contaminated coffee.

A man cannot bear to throw anything away. Junk mail, old newspapers, empty milk cartons all “could contain something valuable that might be useful someday.” If he throws things away, “something terrible will happen.” He hoards so much clutter that he can no longer walk through his house. Insisting that nothing be thrown away, he moves to another house where he continues to hoard.

A 10 year old girl keeps apologizing for “disturbing” her class. She feels that she is too restless and is clearing her throat too loudly. Her teachers are puzzled and over time become annoyed at her repeated apologies since they did not notice any sounds or movements. She is also preoccupied with “being good all the time”.

These people suffer obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that more than 2 percent of the U.S. population, or nearly one out of every 40 people, will suffer from OCD at some point in their lives. The disorder is two to three times more common than schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.Your Read More Link Text

Dual Diagnosis

DualDiag

What is Dual Diagnosis?

Mental Illness and Substance Abuse; Coexisting Disorders

Many families know how difficult it is to find treatment for their relatives with mental illness who also abuse drugs and or alcohol. Programs that treat people with mental illness usually do not treat substance abusers, and programs for substance abusers are not geared for people with mental illness. Individuals with both diagnoses often bounce from one program to another, or are refused treatment by single-diagnosed programs.Your Read More Link Text

Borderline Personality Disorder

BPDWhat is Borderline Personality Disorder?

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is characterized by impulsivity and instability in mood, self-image, and personal relationships. It is fairly common and is diagnosed more often in females than males.

BPD is a most misunderstood, serious mental illness characterized by pervasive instability in moods, interpersonal relationships, self-image, and behavior.  It is a disorder of emotion dysregulation. This instability often disrupts family and work, long-term planning, and the individual’s sense of self-identity. While less well known than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), BPD is as common, affecting between .07 to 2% of the general population.Your Read More Link Text

NAMI National Welcomes New Executive Director

Mary GilibertiNAMI National Announcement

On behalf of NAMI’s Board of Directors, I am very pleased to announce that we have chosen Mary Giliberti to serve as the next Executive Director. Mary succeeds Mike Fitzpatrick, who announced this past January that he would be stepping down at the end of the year.

Prior to joining NAMI, Mary served as a section chief of the Office of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Before that she served as NAMI’s Director of Public Policy and Advocacy from 2006 to 2009, working closely with NAMI State Organizations and NAMI Affiliates.